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A Few 2014 Winter Bat Surveys


February 10 - PA Cave

This was a long, 4+ hour cave trip that involved a few low airspace floats. The worst part about the trip was emerging in 10°F weather. Only one bat was seen, right at the entrance, where no one actually had to get wet to see it. This cave historically had ~500 bats during the winter.

 


 

February 21 - CH Cave

This was a long walk thru sometimes knee deep snow. It took extra hours to find the obscure entrance, we didn't enter until after 3 PM, then spent 4+ hours in the cave. A significant waterfall was in the entrance pit. The hour+ hike out after dark nearly killed us. This cave historically had ~4,000 bats during the winter. On this trip, our team could only find about a dozen.


 

February 24 - LR Mine

This was a long, 4+ hour mine trip that involved alot of walking, some slogging thru nasty orange sludge, and temporarilly getting lost. This mine historically had ~100,000 bats during the winter. On this trip, a massive effort involving over 20 surveyors could only find ~150.


 

February 25 - C Cave

This is a fairly short but fun cave that was refreshingly dry and simple compared to the other trips depicted here. This cave historically had ~100 bats during the winter. On this trip, our team found about a dozen.


 

February 25 - B Cave

This is a very nice, fun cave that was about as dry as a cave gets that happens to take en entire mountain stream in the entrance. This cave historically had a few hundred bats during the winter. On this trip, our team found about a dozen.


 

March 12 - AH Cave

We finally wised up for this remote cave expedition. We drove in using ATVs, had no problem locating the entrances, and steamrolled thru the cave pretty uneventfully. The trip did have the normal assortment of events of its own, considering the cave has a few waterslides and sporty climbs. This cave historically had about 70 bats during the winter. On this trip, our team found three. Special thanks to Thomas Keller who dragged still camera gear thru some nasty crawls which enabled John Chenger to deal with the video camera en-route.